How to raise $50,000 in 50 hours.

An eye-catching video first put social enterprise Who Gives a Crap on the map. Word of mouth kept it there. In our Business Boosters column entrepreneurs share the secrets of their success and what they did in order to achieve scale. When social enterprise Who Gives a Crap set up in 2012, its founders needed $50,000 to begin production. An eye-catching crowdfunding campaign garnered international attention. From there, word of mouth meant the directors could barely keep pace with demand. Co-founder Simon Griffiths tells the story of a start-up with heart. Social enterprise Who Gives a Crap,  an environmentally friendly.
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How to write a great elevator pitch

Thirty seconds isn’t a lot of time, but that’s all you have for the concise, compelling business summary that is an elevator pitch. Convincing the right person at the right time might make all the difference for your startup. Which is why it pays to master the punchy summary. While it may be short, an elevator pitch is by no means small. Crammed into that 30 seconds is an explanation of what your business is, what makes it unique and what it hopes to achieve. On top of this, an elevator pitch needs to capture someone’s interest and ensure it’s.
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Ethical practices help fashion labels stand out from the crowd

Iconic Australian brands such as Veronika Maine and R.M. Williams are just some of those signed up to the Ethical Clothing Australia charter. At the Plato Project, we believe that the best businesses create social and environmental value as well financial profit. Ethical Clothing Australia (ECA) provides independent accreditation to Australian textiles, clothing and footwear brands who care about their workers. ECA protects the rights of both local factory-based workers and outworkers, and in doing so, gives brands a chance to add value to their business story. ECA’s Sigrid McCarthy fielded our questions. Who created Ethical Clothing Australia and how.
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Want inspiration for a new business? Here it is.

Melbourne-based start-up Reground is showing the business community how to do things differently. They are redistributing coffee waste from cafés to sustainable end users in the community. And in the process, they are educating people too. This is a new breed of business – an activist enterprise – that really is creating genuine positive change.   In Melbourne, coffee is a way of life. Culturally, coffee is to the city what the bagel is to New York, or what the croissant is to Paris. The modest “cuppa” is a vehicle for conversation, ideas and community. Fittingly it was over a lazy afternoon.
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Conversations with James Meldrum of Whole Kids

In this regular column, Living Values, Dr Dimity Podger  shares insights and practical approaches from purpose-driven leaders and organisations to help you build a successful business that is a force for good. Eleven years ago, James and Monica Meldrum took a leap and left their corporate jobs to build Whole Kids,  a purpose-driven organic children’s snack food company from scratch. It was a huge turning point in their lives, involving challenges in terms of time, effort, finances and commitment, as well as the recognition of how important their company’s values were to the evolution of their business. The company has.
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Nine amazing social enterprises worldwide

Social enterprises come in many shapes and forms, but they all share a goal of contributing to social or environmental outcomes. Social enterprises span a variety of models, from charitable not-for-profits to for-profit businesses where social and environmental outcomes are still of utmost importance. Here we take a look at nine notable examples, each doing good work in its own unique way.   Thankyou Eight years ago, over 900 million people worldwide had no access to safe drinking water on a daily basis, yet the Australian bottled water industry was worth over $600 million per year. Melbourne-based social enterprise Thankyou.
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Vollie, a new way of volunteering

Vollie is a platform that matches a new breed of online volunteers to the amazing non-profits that need their help. Breaking the Mould is a new column looking at innovative ideas, disruptive start-ups and fresh approaches to entrepreneurship. In this first edition of the column, The Dialogue looks at the ground-breaking start-up, Vollie. We know that young people are motivated by purpose. Millennials want to do good in the world but sometimes the barriers to traditional volunteering are set too high. Writer Olivia Gibson explores Matthew Boyd’s proposed solution, an online platform that links the services of skilled millennials with.
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Social enterprises break the cycle of disadvantage

Now in their fourth year, the Social Enterprise Awards celebrate the best organisations harnessing the power of business for social impact. This year the Social Enterprise Awards once again recognise and celebrate social enterprise in all its diverse forms, shapes and sizes around the country. As well as saluting the best social enterprises in a range of categories, including small and large organisations, in 2016 the ceremony adds a new category, a Women's Impact Award for a social enterprise that has had a demonstrable impact for disadvantaged women. The award is run by Social Traders, Australia’s leading social enterprise development organisation..
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CrowdSpot puts community insight on the map

With applications from public safety to encouraging sustainable transport, check out CrowdSpot, a map-based platform for crowdsourcing insight and feedback from local communities. Women have a right to feel safe in public spaces. But how to gather information that informs policy-making and policing? Beginning with the city of Melbourne, Australia, a new web platform encourages women to place pins on a map of their city and rate these for positive or negative experiences; users can also leave descriptive comments. The information will be shared with City of Melbourne to help the council ensure that girls and young women – the.
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James Tutton on starting Moonlight Cinema

In this edition of Business Boosters, Plato Project co-founder James Tutton remembers the raw enthusiasm he took into his first startup, Moonlight Cinema. An “over the top” presentation to the managers of Melbourne’s Royal Botanic Gardens helped get Moonlight Cinema off the ground. James Tutton, co-founder of the Plato Project, talks about his first startup. Take yourself back to 1995 and Melbourne was a very different place. The Gas and Fuel Corporation buildings were still standing where Federation Square is today. The city’s now famous food culture was still in its infancy. People went to the movies, they went to.
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