Fostering self-awareness & emotional intelligence

“Know thyself” is long established wisdom, a maxim from the ancient Greeks but having deeper roots in religious practice. It has been central to the getting of wisdom; knowing oneself being a fundamental buffer against the vagaries of an uncertain world.

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This is an adapted version of an excerpt from Plato Project’s Mindful Leadership unit.
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Referred to as “self-awareness”, knowing yourself is a strong indicator of emotional intelligence and is a significant factor in being able to make the transition from functional expert to leader. Being aware of one’s self makes it possible to recognise others for what, and who, they are. Understanding other people makes it possible to nurture them. Knowing what makes different people different enables the benefits of diversity to be harnessed. It enables clear decision-making and provides a solid foundation for the humility that is necessary for building strong interpersonal relationships.

The real challenge for a leader though is to allow for awareness of one’s self to develop over time. To understand that self-awareness is not a static, defined thing, but rather a process or a journey. The nature of the journey is elegantly described by Bill George where he writes of the three essential steps to building self-awareness:

Understanding your life story and framing your crucible
Considering your early life story helps to understand the reasons for your current actions. How you frame your crucible (a significant challenge in your life) is especially important, because whilst the crucible has the potential for great suffering, it also has the potential for significant development – to shine a light on what really matters to you.

Create a daily habit of self-reflection
In the day to day activities, it is easy to let the immediate crowd out the important. A daily habit of at least twenty minutes of self-reflection, be that through jogging or meditation or any other reflective practice, enables a renewed focus on what is important.

Seek honest feedback
We all have traits that we cannot see, but others can see in us. These “blind spots” are important, and they can only be revealed by soliciting honest feedback from people you trust.

The notion of personality styles is undoubtedly important. It gives insights into how a person acts. It also gives a starting point from which to undertake the more challenging (and rewarding) journey of self-awareness. And it is self-awareness that Daniel Goleman identifies as being pivotal to a broader Emotional Intelligence (or Emotional Quotient, ‘EQ’). This matters because it is EQ that is the best predictor of successful leaders, not IQ. The best leaders understand relationships, have the ability to perceive how different people interact and know how to draw the best from different people.

The journey of a mindful leader is to move through self-awareness to foster emotional intelligence, and from this emotional intelligence, develop the emotional competencies necessary to lead teams with purpose.

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Find out more about Plato Project’s Mindful Leadership program here.

3 Reasons Purpose is the Next Disruptor

At the turn of the millennium, “digital disruption” was well and truly an established term in the marketplace. Despite the dot-com bubble bursting in 2000, the businesses that dared to invest in digitisation of products and process, such as CommSec and iTunes, created the precedent that businesses who invested in digital were likely to achieve more long-term sustainability and security. Nowadays, “a digital presence” is a status-quo for the majority of businesses around the world – it’s not even considered “disruptive” anymore.

 

“Going digital” fundamentally changed the way we do business with each other and shifted the consumer landscape on a massive scale. The companies who took a punt on digital were able to carve out a significant competitive advantage and had the “first-mover advantage”, the continued relevance of Nike and CommBank, the demise of Kodak, and the rise of Apple, Samsung, and Google are all a testament to that claim.

 

What Digital Did 20 Years Ago, Purpose Is Doing Today

The concept of “purpose” is ambiguous, so let’s start with a definition:

Purpose-driven business is the act of aligning commercial objectives and KPIs with communal, societal, environmental, and/or humanity-oriented outcomes. For example, if McBurgers’ global objective is to “be the #1 fast-food brand in the western world”, then a purpose-driven outcome of that could be “to increase the Quality of Life Scale (QOLS) in each region we operate in by 15%”. 

Similar to how a commercial objective will have a set of tactics that work towards achieving the commercially-driven outcome, the purpose outcomes will be supported by a series of tactics that support both the purpose-driven objective and the commercially-driven outcome. In-short, the role of “purpose” is to support the commercial objectives by adding in purpose-driven KPIs that can be linked to commercial performance. The diagram below explains this relationship:

Screen Shot 2017-07-18 at 11.22.00 am

 

There are three key challenges to purpose-driven business that companies are currently struggling to overcome, they are:

1: The identification and alignment of “purpose” with commercial objectives;

2: The measurement of outcomes that a purpose-driven strategy is achieving;

3: Measuring the impact on commercial outcomes that purpose creates.

Vollie helps businesses around Australia with all of the above through online volunteering and CSR support, and you can read about their thoughts towards overcoming these challenges here.

 

3 Reasons Purpose is the Next Big Disruptor

 

1. “Purpose” Does Not Equal “Less Money”

Since 1990, the Domini 400/MSCI KLD 400 (the index for purpose-driven investments in the USA) has returned an average annual total return of 10.46% compared with the S&P 500’s 9.93%. Sustainable practises and purpose-driven business aren’t just better for the environment, but it can also be better on company performance: if you’re not having to clean up oil spills in the ocean, then your resources can be spent on the development and marketing of products and services that are more valuable to the market!

 

2. Customers Are Loyal to Purpose-Aligned Brands

Some of the world’s biggest and fastest-growing markets are heavily influenced by purpose-driven companies. In 2010, a survey by Edelman found that 70% of surveyed consumers around the world said they were more likely to purchase a product from a company that supports good causes while offering fair prices over a company offering deep discounts but no support for causes. In addition to this startling statement, an even bigger surprise was also uncovered: 81% of Brazillians, 78% of Chinese, 77% of Indians, and 78% of Mexicans are more likely to trust brands and companies that are socially responsible. It turns out that it’s not the western world that’s leading the charge on purpose (only 65% of the rest of the world are more likely to trust those same brands), but those who are potentially most affected by the risks that come with a failure to act.

 

3. Purpose-Driven Companies Are More Resilient

An A.T. Kearney report found that during the 2008 Global Financial Crisis, businesses who were committed to sustainable practices outperformed industry averages by 15% in 16 of the 18 industries studied in the report. In a world that has rising complexities on a daily basis, the importance of investing in strategies that increase resilience to volatile markets will continue to rise with them.

 

Head to Vollie for more information about how they can help.

To find out how you can combine purpose into your professional life, read about our Mindful Leadership program here.

 

The impacts of innovation

We cannot polarise innovation by placing success and failure at two ends of spectrum. There is more fluidity when it comes to defining this pair of ‘opposites’. While innovation success considers impact, we can measure impact from various angles. Likewise, failure is not absolute – it can be useful and an essential part of creativity and the innovation process.

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This is an adapted version of an excerpt from Plato Project’s Leading Innovation unit.
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Innovation success is easy to define: something of value has been created and is aptly serving a market need. It may be completely new and radical or an incremental improvement to a prior product or service. If that has been achieved, then the question is not one of success but sustainability.

While metrics can be applied to assess the value of an innovation once serving the market, we must not lose sight of the intended connection we want to make with people. When we are truly innovating, we want to impact someone’s life positively and for the better. Hearing the experiences of end users is critical to understanding more about the ‘story’ of the product or service beyond – data alone only gives us part of the picture. The ‘why’ remains just as important as the ‘how’, even when the innovation is considered a commercial success. The why (our fundamental reason for doing something) does not change but the how might. We may need to make incremental adjustments, like updates or modifications, or we might need to radically alter a business model to meet the demands of a changing economy.

Successful innovations have ripple effects that change economic, social and/or environmental conditions for particular categories of people or societies as a whole. It is obvious that to continue innovating long-term we need to see a return on what we deliver to the world. Unless we are social enterprises with alternative financial models, innovations must be profitable and therefore sustainable. This is, however, a grey area – many successful innovations are not immediately profitable but are strategically set up to become profitable in time.

To justify this, there must be sufficient evidence to support its future viability – an innovation that addresses the need for renewable energy sources, for example, makes sense as the world demands cleaner and more efficient alternatives. Profit as the only measure of success is not always logical when we consider disruptive innovation. Instead, we will be more inclined to consider how the disruptor changes society, addresses a previously unsolvable problem or upsets the status quo. What preconceived ideas does it challenge, who does it help and what regulations are scrutinised? How it redefines the way we see the world is perhaps more of a measure than anything else when we are thinking impact in the broader sense.

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Find out more about Plato Project’s Leading Innovation program here.

Reference:
Denning, S, ‘Scrum is a major management discovery’, forbes.com, 29 April 2011.

Building a business that will last

Innovative leadership is not a comfortable style of leadership. It is not meant to be. It involves the weathering of uncertain conditions, artful handling of creative conflict and leading people with a vision that might be considered a little too bold. But what makes it difficult also makes it great.

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This is an adapted version of an excerpt from Plato Project’s Starting a Start-Up unit.
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Innovative leadership means some degree of ‘creative destruction’ and starting afresh. Leaders will abandon old, familiar ways and boldly engage team members and stakeholders in new thinking. It is a spirited approach that seeks ideas and experimentation, challenges (and team members who challenge each other), and a strong strategic vision. This kind of leadership requires persistence, as there will often be unrest, uncertainty, periods of doubt and, in some cases, strong opposition to ideas and changes to systems. Riding this period out is an exercise in tenacity and it is crucial that leaders keep the lines of communication open when transitioning to a more openly innovative culture.

The innovative leader will ask provocative questions, stretch and grow their team members and will unapologetically demand greatness. The vision of an innovative leader is a powerful bond that helps to unite an organisation in its mission. It galvanises for action and promotes trust and loyalty in team members – they know the organisation’s direction and feel confident that leadership will get them there.

This being said, a key role of a leader in the early stages of an enterprise is the selection of a great founding team. It is potentially one of the hardest and most important tasks a founder will undertake. Once the key roles become clear, it is matching those key roles with recruits that share in the mission, vision and values that is the challenge. Alignment is crucial but not always easy to find – while some will be technically skilled and able, they may not fully appreciate the broader vision or values. On the other hand, others might fully understand the vision and share the same values, but require upskilling. Obviously, the ideal balance would be both expertise and good cultural alignment – which generally means one thing for a founder: patience.

 

Consider the following when selecting team members:

Consider initial and most critical needs of the business and the roles that support these.

Define roles and decide on strategy for recruitment aligned to mission, vision and values.

Recruit founding team members in line with role descriptions, and mission, vision and values.

 

The relationship between values, behaviours and establishing a ‘culture’ helps to create cohesion in a new venture. Recruiting team members with not just skills or proficiencies but who embody and express similar values means alignment is established from the outset. Establishing the right ‘cultural fit’ is, therefore, essential in the contemporary workplace. Individuals can be trained in new knowledge and skills but it’s not usual that an individual will shift their core values. Values are often inherited, impacted upon by upbringing and personal circumstances. While our priorities may alter, depending on our age, experiences and involvement in different social groups, our values remain as our footings. When recruiting for your new venture, determining a potential employee’s values helps to see if they are the right ‘fit’ – which will help to forge strong bonds and a solid cultural framework early on.

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Find out more about Plato Project’s Starting a Start-Up program here.

How mindful leadership drives success

As is becoming increasingly clear, workplaces – and society in general – are suffering from somewhat of a leadership crisis. Indeed leaders today are faced with new and unique challenges and must cope with exceedingly high expectations. A different – and more effective – approach to leadership is needed.

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This is an adapted version of an excerpt from Plato Project’s Mindful Leadership unit.
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Mindfulness has become a well-worn concept over the past few years, with “Mindfulness and…” books written about any number of subjects. Indeed, there seems to be nothing to which mindfulness cannot be applied. And that’s true; mindfulness can be brought to any aspect of life. But this needs to be done…mindfully. With understanding. With a clear sense of what is at the core of mindfulness.

Bill George offers a simple definition of mindfulness: “the awareness of one’s mental processes and the understanding of how one’s mind works”.

Mindfulness matters for leadership because of the key role leaders play in setting direction, in asking “why?”. This comes best, most authentically, from a place of self-awareness. This place is a place reached by mindfulness. Mindful leaders are good leaders.

Bill George writes the following of mindful leadership:

Mindful leadership is a secular idea that enables people to sustain effective leadership throughout their lifetimes. It enables them to be fully present, aware of themselves and their impact on other people, and focused on achieving the goals of their organisations. Mindful leadership aims to develop self-aware and compassionate leaders by combining Western understanding of authentic leadership with Eastern wisdom about the mind, developed from practices that have been used for thousands of years.

It is important that mindful leaders practise mindfulness. And there’s no one-size-fits all way to do this. They can meditate, practise yoga, pray or participate in other activities that create mindfulness. Mindful leaders do not simply adopt a set of characteristics, but rather the characteristics come from the practice. Mindfulness is more than just this regular practice though. It is about learning to focus awareness in any given moment – becoming conscious of thoughts, emotions and sensations in the body so as to be completely engaged in the present. A combination of a committed practice to enhance mindfulness and focusing attention in daily tasks is important as a leader, so that we are consistently composed and calm – even in the face of difficult situations.

When applying a mindful leadership approach, the results for an organisation are demonstrable. Mindful leaders engage individuals effectively to achieve high performance outcomes, connect with the individual’s sense of identity, understand their rationale for committed action and model behaviours that drive elite performance. By acting in the present moment, mindful leaders foster a culture that enhances consistent performance and attains organisational outcomes.

Mindful Leaders enhance performance of their personnel through a variety of mechanisms which underpin any organisation’s capacity to achieve success. Rather than being outcome focussed, these leaders are focussed in the present moment, effectively engaging in appropriate decision making for the good of individuals and the organisation to achieve success.

Productivity, satisfaction, innovation, focus. Culture. Compassion. These are the attributes that mindful leadership fosters in a workplace. All attributes that are essential to workplaces across all sectors. Tomorrow we’ll look at the critical capabilities of mindful leaders.

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Find out more about Plato Project’s Mindful Leadership program here.

Leadership: Doing it differently and thriving

Innovative leadership is not a comfortable style of leadership. It is not meant to be. It involves the weathering of uncertain conditions, artful handling of creative conflict and leading people with a vision that might be considered a little too bold. But what makes it difficult also makes it great.

_______

This is an adapted version of an excerpt from Plato Project’s Mindful Leadership unit.
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Innovative leadership means some degree of ‘creative destruction’ and starting afresh. Leaders will abandon old, familiar ways and boldly engage team members and stakeholders in new thinking. It is a spirited approach that seeks ideas and experimentation, challenges (and team members who challenge each other), and a strong strategic vision. This kind of leadership requires persistence, as there will often be unrest, uncertainty, periods of doubt and, in some cases, strong opposition to ideas and changes to systems. Riding this period out is an exercise in tenacity and it is crucial that leaders keep the lines of communication open when transitioning to a more openly innovative culture.

Communication and collaboration is central to innovative leadership. This kind of leader understands that he or she is only as powerful as his or her team and will make sure all voices are represented across the organisation and/or hierarchy. The consumer is also invited to ‘co-create’ and offer valuable feedback or feedforward to drive innovation into the future. Having said that, innovative leaders often ignore the voices of the masses and take bold leaps – to disrupt or radicalise industries and markets. Innovative leaders work quickly, look to iterations and agile project management to ensure a bias toward action in the innovation process.

The innovative leader will ask provocative questions, stretch and grow their team members and will unapologetically demand greatness. The vision of an innovative leader is a powerful bond that helps to unite an organisation in its mission. It galvanises for action and promotes trust and loyalty in team members – they know the organisation’s direction and feel confident that leadership will get them there.

Be an innovative leader; that’s your challenge.

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Find out more about Plato Project’s Mindful Leadership program here.

Turning ideas into innovations

While innovation involves ideas, it is the clever channeling of these ideas that leads to a beautifully refined solution. We need to make space for the exploration of ideas – by opening up pathways, assembling skilled teams and adopting processes that involve end users. Only then can we start to experiment, test and assess the value of our models and prototypes.

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This is an adapted version of an excerpt from Plato Project’s Leading Innovation unit.
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Ideation on its own is not innovation but when combined with action, it is a powerful force. Ideation can be a simple act of ‘daydreaming’ to design processes for brainstorming, journey mapping and constructing rudimentary storyboards or models. This allows us to experiment and test ideas before committing to full-scale action.

IDEO’s human-centred design approach is used by leading organisations, such as Microsoft and Samsung, to inspire innovation. It is a method that puts the end user at the heart of design and offers a practical framework for determining the viability of a product, space, service or system. It asks us to observe user behaviour and to consider, or ‘feel’ the user experience.

Consider these steps:

Inspiration – Understand the people you are designing for – observe behaviour, pain points, challenges. See and feel what they experience. Be open to all possibilities.

Ideation – Brainstorming of multiple ideas, based on what was learned from observation and understanding the desires, needs and experiences of users.

Rapid prototyping – A simple prototype makes the possibilities tangible and gives you something to use in testing with users. Cardboard, and other inexpensive, rudimentary materials, are completely permissible. It is not about perfection but quickly building a representation on which a user can offer feedback.

User feedback – Deliver the prototype to users and solicit feedback. This is a critical phase – if your design is failing to arouse the interest of the target user, then it allows for the prototyping of other possibilities.

Iteration – Based on user feedback, it is time to make changes or modifications to the design. The prototyping, testing and iterating phases can move through several cycles until refinement is achieved.

Implementation – Once validated by your users, you can move out of design and into development.

As an extension of this agile project management thinking, scrums and sprints offer focus and structure to the innovation process and are used by high performing organisations such as Zappos. Work is completed in sprints and delivers a functional product, upgrade, service or process that can be taken to market quickly for testing. Further iterations may take place as needed, depending on feedback and results. Old methods generally mean working slowly toward an absolute final deadline – by which time some features of the product may be obsolete or markets have changed. Originally designed for software developers, this way of working is becoming increasingly popular in other organisations when there needs to be a short, defined period dedicated to project development and innovation.

At the heart of this way of working are these principles:
  1. Organise work in short cycles (originally 2–4 weeks)
  2. The management doesn’t interrupt the team during a work cycle
  3. The team reports to the client, not the manager
  4. The team estimates how much time work will take
  5. The team decides how much work it can do in an iteration
  6. The team decides how to do the work in the iteration
  7. The team measures its own performance
  8. Define work goals before each cycle starts
  9. Define work goals through user stories
  10. Systematically remove impediments

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Find out more about Plato Project’s Leading Innovation program here.

Reference:
Denning, S, ‘Scrum is a major management discovery’, forbes.com, 29 April 2011.

Critical capabilities of mindful leaders

Mindful leadership is more than a passing fad. It is a response to a world that desperately needs the characteristics of mindful leaders.

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This is an adapted version of an excerpt from Plato Project’s Mindful Leadership unit.
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Consider this from the Institute for Mindful Leadership:

Mindfulness is often defined as ‘nonjudgmental, moment to moment awareness’. As leaders, it can also be thought of as the cultivation of leadership presence. Being present is quite a complex assignment in a world and global economy that measures time in internet seconds, conceives of the past as the most reliable tool for analyzing and assessing how to proceed into the future, is increasingly interdependent and relational, and dedicates little or no time toward the development of presence in its leaders. But presence can be cultivated and is necessary for a leader to bring all of his/her mind’s capabilities to leadership.

In short, we need mindfulness because we need presence, and we need presence because:
  1. Decisions are having to be made faster and faster
  2. The future is less determined by the past than ever before
  3. The world is more connected and more complex than ever before

By being present in every given moment, mindful leadership lets us see every moment for what it is. We don’t try to rush from one decision to the next, nor do we try to make several decisions all at once. Erika Garms, in Practicing Mindful Leadership, writes of the power of mindfulness in helping us master our attention, something vitally important, given neuroscientists have shown that multitasking is not possible.

Mindful leadership lets people identify that strong inclination to react, and the narrowing of focus under stress. It allows one to understand that “not knowing the answer” for a while is OK, and enables the quiet and spaciousness needed to see clearly and to respond.

Mindful leaders are better able to make decisions based on the facts and objective considerations, pausing to interrupt that reactive, decision-making process which is so often based on narratives rather than facts. Mindful leadership allows leaders to develop self-awareness and self-compassion. As Bill George puts it, these traits make people better able to cope with high levels of stress and pressure. They maintain the capacity to empower people to perform at a very high level even under very difficult circumstances. Authentic leaders never let their organizations lose sight of a shared sense of purpose and common values. With the unity that results from this alignment and consistency, organizations are able to take on very challenging goals, overcome great difficulties and adverse circumstances, and achieve exceptional results on a sustainable basis.

George frames the need for mindfulness as a double action. The first movement is that it moves us away from what he calls “failed leadership”, leaders who lack self-awareness and so sacrifice their values in the pursuit of success and its rewards – money, power and recognition. The second movement is that it moves us towards what he calls “authentic leadership”, leaders who understand that the purpose of their leadership is serving their customers, employees and investors, not their self-interest.

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Find out more about Plato Project’s Mindful Leadership program here.

Adapting leadership styles

The self-aware leader can manage for different personality styles as their self-awareness allows them to understand others better.

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This is an adapted version of an excerpt from Plato Project’s Mindful Leadership unit.
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A range of tools and frameworks have been created to objectively measure personality. The best known is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator®, a tool developed in the 1940s from the theory of personality types established by Carl Jung. It is robust and well used, providing an insight into apparently contradictory behaviours by understanding a person’s preferences in relation to four key dichotomies. The end point is sixteen personality types categorised by a four letter “code” (such as ‘ESTJ’) that are useful for managing others and for understanding team dynamics.

The four dichotomies of the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator:

  1. Favourite world: Do you prefer to focus on the outer world or on your own inner world? This is called Extraversion (E) or Introversion (I).
  2. Information: Do you prefer to focus on the basic information you take in or do you prefer to interpret and add meaning? This is called Sensing (S) or Intuition (N).
  3. Decisions: When making decisions, do you prefer to first look at logic and consistency or first look at the people and special circumstances? This is called Thinking (T) or Feeling (F).
  4. Structure: In dealing with the outside world, do you prefer to get things decided or do you prefer to stay open to new information and options? This is called Judging (J) or Perceiving (P).

An understanding of leadership and working styles enhances the ways we relate to others in the workplace. By engaging with people in their own personal “zone”, we begin to interact positively with different personality styles. This gives us the opportunity to explore how to work with people in diverse ways, because it’s not reasonable to expect people to act homogeneously. It’s not even reasonable to expect people to respond in a way that feels ‘rational’ from only your perspective, or to expect people to act as you might expect. Rather, people act in a way that is internally consistent. Knowing these patterns is therefore useful.

How to manage personalities in the office

The MBTI personality inventory enables the consideration of how people can be managed most effectively. A truly effective leader needs to be able to switch between ‘types’, or as described by Judith Nicol and Paul Sparrow, to be at all times able to operate in a “Hard Power” and “Soft Power” mode. A hard power approach will be necessary when decisions need to be made and action taken because it is clear, directive, confident and rational leadership. A soft power approach will be better when collaborating or coaching because it is more about listening, reflecting, enabling and supporting.

A great leader nurtures individual difference to create an effective team. A great leader builds on individual strengths and compensates for individual weaknesses. A great leader looks to develop both the team and the individuals in the team. It is only through both understanding others and fostering self-awareness that a leader can have the EQ necessary to knit together the many personalities into a highly effective team. An ineffective leader sinks into a morass of micro-management and haphazard relationships where “people like me” are favoured, or learns the skills of leadership and becomes adept at working with emotional intelligence.

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Find out more about Plato Project’s Mindful Leadership program here.

Building an ethical business model

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This is an adapted version of an excerpt from Plato Project’s Starting a Start-Up unit.
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Anchoring the business model in strong ethical principles from the outset means those values are infused in the venture’s culture. It sets a precedent for what is expected in operations and influences decision-making and behaviours. This may mean investigating supply networks to assess impact on the environment and human rights, or creating value in all components of the value chain by making socially-conscious choices.

This approach raises morale and gives meaning to an organisation’s offering. While it is right, it also makes good business sense. Ethical trading means tapping into niche markets and distinguishing a point of difference from the competition. There are also distinct financial rewards; raised employee engagement, long-term customer loyalty and the ability to form strong partnerships with other enterprises and communities. As an example, successful handmade cosmetics company, LUSH, has maintained a firm commitment to ethics since inception. Its ‘ethical buying team’ has established a network of relationships with small-scale farmers and suppliers worldwide – to know exactly what is going into their products. LUSH’s also uses recyclable packaging to reduce landfill and is actively involved in social and environmental causes. Customers not only buy LUSH products, they share in its value and ethical philosophy.

This focus on environmental sustainability is becoming a necessary consideration for all businesses. Sustainability is more than being environmentally aware as a matter of corporate responsibility. Many new enterprises are looking at the real value of sustainability as both a way to do good and achieve long-lasting success. They can assess proposed business practices in relation to sustainability, adjust and align all practices to reflect commitment to sustainability, or integrate sustainability into new venture strategy from the outset. This attitude is not just part of strategy, it actually drives strategy, and the business’ purpose, from the inside out.

Sustainability is also about ensuring the new venture is financially viable long-term. This kind of security forms a bedrock for the venture’s broader sustainability goals. When the business is financially sound and able to take care of itself, it is better equipped to maintain its partnerships and networks, and affect real social change.

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Find out more about Plato Project’s Starting a Start-Up program here.

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